Gardelli coffee


Regular price $4.25

Description

THE STORY BEHIND This pure, organic coffee is the only one in Antioquia that is 100% certified organic. The coffee trees are raised on the pristine steep slopes of the Andes overlooking the Cauca River. Finca owner Luis Emilio Vélez allows the wild vampire bats on his finca to live inside his coffee storage. In the same space as the well protected coffee bags. He always stores all his coffee on the farm in GrainPro. You could almost say coffee grower Luis Emilio is a freak, but in the positive sense. He does not allow any compromise to produce his characteristic purely organic coffee. He recycles everything and promote his attitude everywhere he goes. For instance he collects al the plastic wrappers of friends and family, has them stuffed in plastic soda bottles and uses these as bricks to construct buildings on his farm! Visiting Cocondo, near the small town of Titiribí in Antioquia, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the farm’s name is a play on words inspired by Macondo, the mystical town where Garcia Marquez´s famous novel, A Hundred Years of Solitude, takes place. Indeed, the setting is magical….and real! However, Luis Emilio Velez, the owner, will explain to you that the farm’s name derives from its location. Nothing more. Although the farm’s real name is Tebaida, many years ago villagers gave it the name Cocondo, an abbreviation of ‘coco hondo’, which literally translates as ‘deep coconut’. This strange moniker refers playfully to the farm’s location in the lower part of a steep ridge that looks not unlike a hollowed out coconut when viewed from above. The plantation has been developed without harming any of the original vegetation. A walk through the coffee fields, feels more like a pleasant (though steep) forest stroll. Luis Emilio even created an eco-trail, complete with signs, that winds through various lots with different varieties, a spring and even a small fall that he sometimes uses as a shower. THE VARIETY In 1961, Colombia’s Coffee Research Institute, CENICAFE, began research and field trials with Hibrido de Timor. By 1968, the same organization was combining Timor hybrid with the popular Caturra cultivar, a program that was to continue in even fuller force throughout the 1970s. In 1982, CENICAFE released the Colombia cultivar, a product of five generations of breeding and backcrossing in the Catimor line in order to marry disease resistance with good cup quality and productivity. Research continued throughout the 1980s and 90s and, even, accelerated in the race to discover a truly resistant strain that didn’t sacrifice flavour. In 2002, CENICAFE introduced the Tabi cultivar: a variety obtained by crossing Typica, Bourbon and Timor Hybrid. One of the most important attributes is its resistance to coffee leaf rust, but it also displays the good cup quality characteristics of its Bourbon and Typica parents. Tabi is morphologically very similar to Bourbon and Typica, being tall with long branches; however, its fruits and seeds are slightly larger. It can be grown in high density (up to up to 3,000 trees per hectare) and adapts well to high altitudes. The name Tabi means “good” in the Guambiano (a native Colombian tribe) dialect. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Dry process seems simple: pick the fruit, lay it out in the sun until it turns from red to brown to near-back, and then hull off off the thick, dried outer layer in one step to reveal the green bean. It is a method suited to arid regions, where the sun and heat can dry the seed inside the intact fruit skin. It's often referred to as "natural coffee" because of its simplicity, and because the fruit remains intact and undisturbed, a bit like drying grapes into raisins. Since it requires minimal investment, the dry process method is a default to create cheap commodity-grade coffee in areas that have the right climate capable of drying the fruit and seed. But it’s a fail in humid or wet regions. If the drying isn't progressing fast enough, the fruit degrades, rots or molds. Dry-processed coffees can also be wildly inconsistent. If you want a cleanly-fruited, sweet, intense cup, dry process (DP) takes more hand labor than the wet process. Even the most careful pickers will take green unripe or semi-ripe coffee off the branch as they pick red, ripe cherry. If these are not removed in the first days of drying, the green turns to brown that is hard to distinguish from the ripe fruit.

Taste Notes

Blackberry / Fig / Papaya / Prune / Clementine

Varietal

Tabi

Process

Dry (natural)

Elevation

1650 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND We are very excited to have again a amazing lot from Gesha Village in Ethiopia... and we are the only one in Europe having the outstanding lot 96! Gesha Village Estate is an exciting and inspiring project from Adam Overton and Rachel Samuel, with the help of many talented individuals. The coffee farm is located near the Gori Gesha forest in far western Ethiopia, near what is considered the origin of the Gesha lineage that has since traveled so far. In 2011 Adam and Rachel began developing a 500 hectare coffee farm in Gesha, Ethiopia with one vision in mind: to produce the best coffee in the world. After an exhaustive search, the estate location was chosen based on our strict criteria of altitude (1900-2100 MASL), ample rainfall, temperature patterns, rich virgin forest soil, old growth trees, and an existing coffee ecosystem. A seed selection has been harvested from the Gori Gesha wild coffee forest found 20 km from our farm, the site where the famous Panamanian Gesha was selected in the 1930s. In their first three years we have planted over 30,000 native shade trees on land that had previously been deforested. Research, conservation, and exploration of the Gesha variety are ongoing focuses of their farm. They have begun projects on genetic testing, climate research and a Gesha botanical garden. The planting density of the farm at 2000-trees/hectare is moderate and supports a sustainable ecosystem for our coffee. The priority is maintaining the rich biodiversity of the native forest canopy that the heirloom Gesha coffee spontaneously grows in. The Meanit people of Ethiopia are the inhabitants and protectors of Gesha. THE VARIETY Rare, exclusive and fetching a heavy price tag, Gesha is often associated with coffees from Panama when in fact cultivation of the Gesha varietal only began there in the 1960s. Gesha is an original variety of coffee that was discovered in the 1930s in the mountains around the Southwestern town of Gesha, Ethiopia. Gesha trees grow tall and can be distinguished by their beautiful and elongated leaves. The quality of this coffee can be drastically improved when grown at extremely high elevation. The Geisha revolution set off a intense search for Geisha among coffee buyers and a primal pilgrimage to Ethiopia to find the source of that flavor. The roads those buyers traveled brought them in a wood in far western Ethiopia near a small town called Gesha in the forests where coffee was born and still grows wild. Gesha 1931 is from this place. Its name reflects the place and year it was collected by scientists who fanned out on a research expedition in Ethiopia to catalogue its coffee varieties. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Dry process seems simple: pick the fruit, lay it out in the sun until it turns from red to brown to near-back, and then hull off off the thick, dried outer layer in one step to reveal the green bean. It is a method suited to arid regions, where the sun and heat can dry the seed inside the intact fruit skin. It's often referred to as "natural coffee" because of its simplicity, and because the fruit remains intact and undisturbed, a bit like drying grapes into raisins. Since it requires minimal investment, the dry process method is a default to create cheap commodity-grade coffee in areas that have the right climate capable of drying the fruit and seed. But it’s a fail in humid or wet regions. If the drying isn't progressing fast enough, the fruit degrades, rots or molds. Dry-processed coffees can also be wildly inconsistent. If you want a cleanly-fruited, sweet, intense cup, dry process (DP) takes more hand labor than the wet process. Even the most careful pickers will take green unripe or semi-ripe coffee off the branch as they pick red, ripe cherry. If these are not removed in the first days of drying, the green turns to brown that is hard to distinguish from the ripe fruit.

Taste Notes

Jasmine / Bergamot / Strawberry / Pineapple / Peach

Varietal

Gesha 1931

Process

Natural (dry)

Elevation

1900-2100 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND We are incredibly thrilled to present you this truly amazing coffee! This is a single-variety lot of a rare cultivar named Wush Wush. El Zafiro is located 10km from Popayan between the Colombian Central and Western mountain ranges. The farm experiences varying day and night temperatures between 28 and 12 degrees making the micro-climate ideal for growing coffee at altitude allowing for slow maturation of cherry. The temperate climate also enables wet parchment to dry at a steady and even rate. Cherry is meticulously handpicked ensuring only optimally ripe coffee is picked. It is then hand sorted prior to pulping, where it is washed using traditional Colombian processing methods, and dried in parabolic drying rooms. Post milling, green beans are hand sorted to remove any defects prior to it being vacuum packed prior to export. El Zafrio is 7ha in size and planted with Wush Wush, Bourbon and Castillo. 20 years ago it was originally planted with Typica and Bourbon, however, Roya took its toll on these heirloom varieties and growing them became untenable. New efforts are currently underway to restore these varieties and have them back in production. THE VARIETY The Wush Wush variety is rare and not much is known about it. It is believed to have made its way from Ethiopia, apparently originating in and around Bonga in Southwest Jimma. It arrived in Colombia about 30 years ago, it’s long and pointed cheery has similar physical characteristics to that of Gesha. It is also similar in cup profile with jasmine, rose, lemon grass and stone fruit flavour notes and sweetness, with a complex acidity but with a more pronounced body than Gesha. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS During the last two years, Ceferino has been trying di erent processes at El Zafiro, such as prolonged fermentations with controlled protocols. This has helped to produce most of the coffee with basic anaerobic fermentation process of 20 hours like this special lot.

Taste Notes

Jasmine / Bergamot / Lime / Peach / Guava / Honeydew

Varietal

Wush Wush

Process

Anaerobic washed

Elevation

1940-2100 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND We are incredibly honoured to offer you this super limited-release lot. 3rd place Brazil Cup of Excellence 2017 main competition. Best Organic lot Brazil Cup of Excellence 2017. Fazendas Klem is the lead on the Matas de Minas project and an example for Organic production in the region. After extensive studies into Organic processing, soil protection and many other variables, they have formulated a method for themselves using local materials grow their coffee. This constitutes the use of every organic material available, but also using minerals found nearby at large rock formations. Only a few years ago they have decided to start exporting themselves and providing technical assistance to others in the region. Step-by-step they are spreading the best practices from there own path towards becoming fully organic. As second crop they have planted trees that produce small avocados, making use of the same soils and certifications given. The Klem estate is USDA Organic, Rainforest Alliance and UTZ certified. The full estate is divided over several areas, all of which are farmed by the Klem family (existing out of five brothers) and several other families. All the micro lot are done manually, completely separated using raised drying beds in a solar dryer. The founder and grandfather Nagype Klem still works on the main section of the farm, next to where they are roasting samples and cupping all of the coffees throughout the season. THE VARIETY Catuai is a cross between highly productive Mundo Novo and compact Caturra, made by the Instituto Agronomico (IAC) of Sao Paulo State in Campinas, Brazil. The plant is highly productive compared to Bourbon, in part because of its small size, which allows plants to be closely spaced; it can be planted at nearly double the density. The plant’s shape makes it relatively easy apply pest and disease treatments. It is mainly characterized by great vigor and its low height; it is less compact than Caturra. It is highly susceptible to coffee leaf rust. Catuaí derives from the Guarani multo mom, meaning “very good". The cultivar was created in 1949 from a crossing of yellow Caturra and Mundo Novo, and initially called H-2077.There are yellow-fruited and red-fruited types, and there have since been many selections in different countries. The variety was released in Brazil 1972 after pedigree selection (selection of individual plants through successive generations) and is in wide cultivation there. It was first introduced in Honduras in 1979, where it was tested by Instituto Hondureño del Café (IHCAFÉ). It was released commercially in 1983, after IHCAFÉ selected two lines for planting. In Honduras today, Catuai accounts for nearly half of the Arabica coffee in cultivation. Researchers at IHCAFÉ are actively pursuing breeding with Catuai, including creating hybrid crosses between Catuai and Timor Hybrid lines. Catuai, whose small stature allows it to be planted densely and harvested more efficiently, led in part to the intensification of full-sun coffee cultivation in Central America in the 1970s and 1980s. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Dry process seems simple: pick the fruit, lay it out in the sun until it turns from red to brown to near-back, and then hull off off the thick, dried outer layer in one step to reveal the green bean. It is a method suited to arid regions, where the sun and heat can dry the seed inside the intact fruit skin. It's often referred to as "natural coffee" because of its simplicity, and because the fruit remains intact and undisturbed, a bit like drying grapes into raisins. Since it requires minimal investment, the dry process method is a default to create cheap commodity-grade coffee in areas that have the right climate capable of drying the fruit and seed. But it’s a fail in humid or wet regions. If the drying isn't progressing fast enough, the fruit degrades, rots or molds. Dry-processed coffees can also be wildly inconsistent. If you want a cleanly-fruited, sweet, intense cup, dry process (DP) takes more hand labor than the wet process. Even the most careful pickers will take green unripe or semi-ripe coffee off the branch as they pick red, ripe cherry. If these are not removed in the first days of drying, the green turns to brown that is hard to distinguish from the ripe fruit.

Taste Notes

Melon / Papaya / Kiwi / Plum / Grape

Varietal

Catuai

Process

Dry (natural)

Elevation

1150 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND This pure, organic coffee is the only one in Antioquia that is 100% certified organic. The coffee trees are raised on the pristine steep slopes of the Andes overlooking the Cauca River. Finca owner Luis Emilio Vélez allows the wild vampire bats on his finca to live inside his coffee storage. In the same space as the well protected coffee bags. He always stores all his coffee on the farm in GrainPro. You could almost say coffee grower Luis Emilio is a freak, but in the positive sense. He does not allow any compromise to produce his characteristic purely organic coffee. He recycles everything and promote his attitude everywhere he goes. For instance he collects al the plastic wrappers of friends and family, has them stuffed in plastic soda bottles and uses these as bricks to construct buildings on his farm! Visiting Cocondo, near the small town of Titiribí in Antioquia, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the farm’s name is a play on words inspired by Macondo, the mystical town where Garcia Marquez´s famous novel, A Hundred Years of Solitude, takes place. Indeed, the setting is magical….and real! However, Luis Emilio Velez, the owner, will explain to you that the farm’s name derives from its location. Nothing more. Although the farm’s real name is Tebaida, many years ago villagers gave it the name Cocondo, an abbreviation of ‘coco hondo’, which literally translates as ‘deep coconut’. This strange moniker refers playfully to the farm’s location in the lower part of a steep ridge that looks not unlike a hollowed out coconut when viewed from above. The plantation has been developed without harming any of the original vegetation. A walk through the coffee fields, feels more like a pleasant (though steep) forest stroll. Luis Emilio even created an eco-trail, complete with signs, that winds through various lots with different varieties, a spring and even a small fall that he sometimes uses as a shower. THE VARIETY In 1961, Colombia’s Coffee Research Institute, CENICAFE, began research and field trials with Hibrido de Timor. By 1968, the same organization was combining Timor hybrid with the popular Caturra cultivar, a program that was to continue in even fuller force throughout the 1970s. In 1982, CENICAFE released the Colombia cultivar, a product of five generations of breeding and backcrossing in the Catimor line in order to marry disease resistance with good cup quality and productivity. Research continued throughout the 1980s and 90s and, even, accelerated in the race to discover a truly resistant strain that didn’t sacrifice flavour. In 2002, CENICAFE introduced the Tabi cultivar: a variety obtained by crossing Typica, Bourbon and Timor Hybrid. One of the most important attributes is its resistance to coffee leaf rust, but it also displays the good cup quality characteristics of its Bourbon and Typica parents. Tabi is morphologically very similar to Bourbon and Typica, being tall with long branches; however, its fruits and seeds are slightly larger. It can be grown in high density (up to up to 3,000 trees per hectare) and adapts well to high altitudes. The name Tabi means “good” in the Guambiano (a native Colombian tribe) dialect. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Dry process seems simple: pick the fruit, lay it out in the sun until it turns from red to brown to near-back, and then hull off off the thick, dried outer layer in one step to reveal the green bean. It is a method suited to arid regions, where the sun and heat can dry the seed inside the intact fruit skin. It's often referred to as "natural coffee" because of its simplicity, and because the fruit remains intact and undisturbed, a bit like drying grapes into raisins. Since it requires minimal investment, the dry process method is a default to create cheap commodity-grade coffee in areas that have the right climate capable of drying the fruit and seed. But it’s a fail in humid or wet regions. If the drying isn't progressing fast enough, the fruit degrades, rots or molds. Dry-processed coffees can also be wildly inconsistent. If you want a cleanly-fruited, sweet, intense cup, dry process (DP) takes more hand labor than the wet process. Even the most careful pickers will take green unripe or semi-ripe coffee off the branch as they pick red, ripe cherry. If these are not removed in the first days of drying, the green turns to brown that is hard to distinguish from the ripe fruit.

Taste Notes

Blackberry / Fig / Papaya / Prune / Clementine

Varietal

Tabi

Process

Dry (natural)

Elevation

1650 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND Ernedis Rodriguez is a young farmer, extremely motivated to produce great coffees. He always come up with crazy ideas for experiments with different types of processing, like extended fermentations in different ways (aerobic, anaerobic, partially in cherry etc.) Ernedis has been producing coffee his entire life and the hard work and effort that he puts into producing his coffees is evident not only in cup quality, but also in the physical quality of the beans. El Paraiso is a beautiful farm 12km east of Gigante, Huila, perched exactly at the rim of a mountain with most of the fields facing west across the beautiful Magdalena river valley. His mostly caturra trees grow at an elevation of approx. 1840m above sea level guaranteeing a great sweetness in the cup. The farm consists of a total of 14 hectares, of which 7 are part of a natural reserve. The other 7 hectares currently produce coffee, 70% of which are of the Caturra varietal and 30% Castillo. All of his specialty lots are 100% Caturra and the Castillo lots are processed and sold separately to help finance the daily operations of the farm. The coffee of Ernedis can be described as extremely sweet and full in the mouth. THE VARIETY Caturra coffee varietal was developed by the Alcides Carvalho Coffee Center of the IAC, Instituto Agronomico of the Sao Paulo State in Brazil. In 1937, IAC received seed samples of genetic materials originated on the border of the states of Minas Gerais and Espírito Santo. It was from Red Caturra and yellow Caturra cultivars. These two cultivars originated by natural mutation of Bourbon Red, originally a tall coffee shrub, found in the Serra do Caparaó , which is now a mountainous National Park north east of the city of Rio de Janeiro. These are the main agronomic characteristics of the Red and Yellow Caturra varietals: 1. It is the of small size, of reduced length of internodes, leaves and side branches, providing compact appearance to the coffee shrub. 2. This is the first naturally occurred coffee mutation found, with small size and high yield capacity 3. They have excellent quality in the cup because they have virtually 100% of the Bourbon coffee in their genetic makeup. 4. the conditions in which they were planted in Brazil to cultivate Caturra showed low hardiness and consequent lack of vigor after a few harvests, which led to the premature depletion in yield. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS This 100% Caturra lot has been processed with extended fermentations to up to 72 hours. He dries all coffee in a shaded greenhouse on the rim of the mountain guaranteeing good ventilation across the drying beds.

Taste Notes

Redcurrant / Gooseberry / Green apple / Pear / Caramel

Varietal

Caturra

Process

Wet (washed)

Elevation

1840mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND This coffee was produced from trees of the admired heirloom SL28 and SL34 varieties of Arabica, and processed at the Karani wet mill. Despite challenges ranging from unclear government coffee policy and urban encroachment on prime coffee lands to chronically unstable weather, the famed Kenya coffee auction system and its participating cooperatives continue to produce some of the world’s most elegant and distinctive coffees. AA is the highest grade of Kenya coffee based on bean size and fewest physical imperfections. Karani is located in Kirinyaga County in the Central highlands of Kenya. It is one of 10 factories that form the Kabare Cooperative Society. The Karani factory is a set in a beautiful, fertile and forested location and is surrounded by thousands of smallholder subsistence farmers who grow coffee as a cash crop alongside potatoes, bananas, mangoes, avocados and some livestock - usually a cow or two for diary production and chickens for eggs and meat. The average altitude of these smallholdings is approximately 1,500 MASL, a factor which contributes to the fine flavour of the coffee. The growers have the advantage of deep and rich soils that were created from the ash of the extinct volcano – Mount Kenya. The Karani factory, which was established in 1968, is managed by David Mwendia who has held that position since 2008. David is focused on producing high quality coffee so is strict with deliveries by smallholders to the factory, allowing only very ripe, red cherry to be processed. Farmers must tip their cherries onto a tarpaulin sheet for inspection and further sorting before the coffee can be weighed and submitted to the pulper hoppers. THE VARIETY SL28 was bred by Scott Laboratories in 1931 from Tanganyika D.R, and has become very popular throughout Kenya and is recognised as a variety of exceptional cup quality. It has wide leaves with coppery tips. Beans are wide and productivity comparatively low. Though it is not substantiated that we can find, some sources claim that Scott Labs crossed mutations of French Mission, Mocha and Yemen Typica to produce the SL 28 variety. No matter the exact genetic composition, almost certainly their original goal was to create a plant with high quality, reasonable productivity and great drought resistance. SL 34 is a mutation of French Mission, originating from the plantation of Loresho in Kabete, SL 34 has wide leaves with bronzy tips. It is widely grown throughout Kenya. SL 34 is valued for its high productivity in different climate conditions and great height ranges. It is also claimed to be resistant towards draught and strong rainfall. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS After harvesting the coffee is delivered to the factory and undergoes the wet processing method, water is pumped to the reservoir tanks for pulping and recirculation. After pulping the coffee is stored overnight, washed, soaked and spread on the drying on tables. The parchment is then frequently turned on the drying tables, sorted and then stored whilst it awaits delivery to the millers.

Taste Notes

Vanilla / Black currant / Lemon / Honey / Apricot

Varietal

SL28 & SL34

Process

Wet (washed)

Elevation

1500-1600 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND Sopacdi is reviving the reputation of the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo for being a region which can produce outstanding Washed Arabica coffees. There had been no markets for farmers’ coffee for decades. They had no option but to take the dangerous smuggling route across Lake Kivu, bartering their coffee for food and everyday essentials. Others had been forced to flee their land due to the violent civil war. Nine years ago, a small group came together, inspired by the newly formed specialty coffee co-operatives in Rwanda and talked about doing the same. In 2008 they found their first specialty coffee buyer and since then, the momentum has been building. Today, Sopacdi has over 3,200 farmer members and they have recently achieved Fairtrade and organic certification. Sopacdi unites farmers from different ethnic groups – they speak Kirundi, Kihavu or Kinyarwanda – yet they are united in their vision to improve their families lives and communities through coffee. Many of Sopacdi’s coffee farmers are widows, their husbands drowned smuggling coffee across Lake Kivu. Sopacdi pays a price premium for ‘Women’s Coffee’ to its female members, which helps enable them to provide for their families. In 2011, Sopacdi opened the first coffee washing station in the Congo for forty years and theirs was the first coffee to achieve the top national grade – Kivu 2 – since 1967. Sopacdi’s farmers are renovating their land, incorporating measures to combat soil erosion and they are planting new coffee seedlings from the co-operative’s own nurseries. Farmers are attending workshops led by agronomists to learn about organic composting and mulching. Sopacdi has established a small tools fund to enable farmers to buy the equipment needed to produce the best quality coffee. THE VARIETY Blue Mountain is a Typica mutation originally found and cultivated in Jamaica’s Blue Mountains. Over time people began naming it after its place of origin: Blue Mountain. Blue Mountain is now widely cultivated on Kona Island in Hawaii, where it is known by the name ‘Guatemala’. Genetically these two are undistinguishable. Beginning in 1913, it was also introduced in West Kenya, though it was never successfully planted in other parts of Kenya. It was the first coffee cultivar introduced to Papua New Guinea. Blue Mountain is resistant to coffee berry disease and, like Typica, capable of growing to great heights. Nevertheless, it is not capable of acclimatizing to all climate conditions and tends to retain its taste qualities irrespective of location. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Washed coffees focus solely on the bean. They let you taste you what’s on the inside, not the outside. Washed coffees depend almost 100% on the bean having absorbed enough natural sugars and nutrients during its growing cycle. This means the varietal, soil, weather, ripeness, fermentation, washing, and drying are absolutely key. Washed coffees reflect both the science of growing the perfect coffee bean and the fact that farmers are an integral part of crafting the taste of a coffee bean. When looking at washed coffees, it becomes apparent that the country of origin and environmental conditions play a vital role in adding to the flavour. During wet processing, the pulp (i.e.the exocarp and a part of the mesocarp) is removed mechanically. The remaining mesocarp, called mucilage, sticks to the parchment and is also removed before drying. During this process, the sugars present in the mucilage are removed through natural fermentation or mechanical scrubbing. Mucilage is insoluble in water and clings to parchment too strongly to be removed by simple washing. Mucilage can be removed by fermentation followed by washing or by strong friction in machines called mucilage removers. Fermentation can be done by stacking the coffee outside or placing them under water and allowing nature to take its course. After the sugars are removed, the beans then can be taken through a secondary washing to remove any additional debris, or taken immediately to the beds for drying.

Taste Notes

Red currant / Spicy rose / Vanilla / Tangerine / White pepper

Varietal

Blue Mountain

Process

Wet (washed)

Elevation

1500-2000 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND The name Nano Challa refers to a local mythic tale about a challenge to become King of Jimma, and the coop adopted it to signify their desire to be a strong cooperative. Indeed, many coops in the West of Ethiopia have struggled to find good buyers who will pay enough for the coffee, to manage their own debts, and from internal struggles and graft. Nano Challa was formed as part of a new initiative to aid farmers in a more comprehensive way. This co-op, which is now 350 farmers and growing, has a tremendous mix of languages, tribes, cultures and religions. The program is administered by Technoserve, partially funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, a non-government organisation that not only coordinates agronomists and managers for each of the coops they work with, but also has a business adviser assigned that helps the cooperative manage their debt, re-invest in quality improvements at the mill, and verifies distribution of income to all members. Free of debt, Nano Challa have recently purchased a second depulper to facilitate their continued growth in both cooperative size and market demand. The farms are at altitudes between 1850 to 2100 meters, planted in old regional varieties of coffee. Nano Challa is an exceptional expression of provenance from, the birthplace of coffee, Ethiopia. This year’s Nano Challa is characteristically Ethiopian in profile and presents sweet, refreshingly clean and syrupy in the cup. THE VARIETY Ethiopian Heirloom, why the generic name? It's estimated that there are somewhere in-between six and ten thousand coffee varietals in Ethiopia. And due to this colossal figure, there hasn’t been the genetic testing to allow buyers to distinguish the varietal. With the cross pollination that naturally happens in the wild, the name ‘Ethiopian Heirloom’ exists as a catch all phrase to describe this happenstance. However, that really makes Ethiopian quite a mystery – and an interesting mystery with that as each village or town could potentially have a different varietal which could carry very unique properties. Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee, meaning it was only naturally found here. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Washed coffees focus solely on the bean. They let you taste you what’s on the inside, not the outside. Washed coffees depend almost 100% on the bean having absorbed enough natural sugars and nutrients during its growing cycle. This means the varietal, soil, weather, ripeness, fermentation, washing, and drying are absolutely key. Washed coffees reflect both the science of growing the perfect coffee bean and the fact that farmers are an integral part of crafting the taste of a coffee bean. When looking at washed coffees, it becomes apparent that the country of origin and environmental conditions play a vital role in adding to the flavour. During wet processing, the pulp (i.e.the exocarp and a part of the mesocarp) is removed mechanically. The remaining mesocarp, called mucilage, sticks to the parchment and is also removed before drying. During this process, the sugars present in the mucilage are removed through natural fermentation or mechanical scrubbing. Mucilage is insoluble in water and clings to parchment too strongly to be removed by simple washing. Mucilage can be removed by fermentation followed by washing or by strong friction in machines called mucilage removers. Fermentation can be done by stacking the coffee outside or placing them under water and allowing nature to take its course. After the sugars are removed, the beans then can be taken through a secondary washing to remove any additional debris, or taken immediately to the beds for drying.

Taste Notes

Jasmine / Peach / Mandarin / Lime / Apricot

Varietal

Heirlooms

Process

Washed (wet)

Elevation

1850-2100 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND Cascara tea started out as a fringe trend but is now emerging as a highly sought after product in the world of specialty coffee. Milled coffee skins (exocarp) are often used as an organic fertilizer in many coffee growing regions. But over the past few years, producers have found that when dried properly, it can be used as an herbal tea. Cascara or ‘La Sultana' (meaning dried grape in Spanish) is a bi-product from the process of coffee milling or pulping. In this specific case the Cascara from the Mzungu project is obtained by the milling (hulling) of the dried coffee cherries as oppose to pulping from the fresh cherries. This coffee lot is the fruit of that labor. 2 and 1⁄2 years after his pioneering world brewers cup single tree lot Rubens Gardelli is proud to present this unique coffee from Uganda. Forging close links with the farmer alex and forming an export company with close friend Dison, has allowed complete traceability and control from tree to cup. originally a small competition lot, this project grew to encompass all of Alex farm production. The indigenous nyanzaland varietal and SL14 are grown at 1900 masl and processed using a proprietary natural method which is completely new and unique to Uganda! The coffee where this Cascara is from was presented for the first time by Rubens Gardelli during his 2017 Italy Brewers Cup and it was brewed by Michael Manhart during his 2017 World Brewers Cup performance...after all national champion presentation (open service) Michael and Mzungu were at the first place in the World!!!

Taste Notes

Cherry pulp / Raisin / Plum / Mango / Raspberry / Honey

Varietal

SL14 & Nyanzaland

Process

Gardelli natural

Elevation

1900-2000 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND Fazenda Nossa Senhora Aparecida has been in the Dias Villela family for over 60 years and 4 generations. In 2013, it produced the winning BRAZIL – CUP OF EXCELLENCE natural coffee which scored 92.22 points. The Fazenda has consistently produced finalists across important national competitions. Located in Carmo de Minas, in the Serra da Mantiqueira de Minas, the Fazenda enjoys excellent climate and temperature conditions. It also enjoys from excellent production and post-harvest practices leading to the results it consistently obtains for its “Natural” processed coffees. Today, Cinthia, Ticiana, Claudia and Roney Dias Villela, children of Regina Lucia Dias and Edmo Junqueira Villela manage all aspects of the day-to-day operations. The Dias Villela family believes firmly in sustainable practices and are focused on the highest quality. THE VARIETY Bourbon is one of the most culturally and genetically important C. arabica varieties in the world, known for excellent quality in the cup at the highest altitudes. It is one of the two main cultivars from which new cultivars are bred, the other being typical. Historical records indicate that Bourbon was taken from the coffee forests of Southwestern Ethiopia to Yemen, where it were cultivated as a crop; recent genetic studies have confirmed this. Bourbon coffee was first produced in Réunion, which was known as Bourbon island before 1789. It was later taken by the French to mainland Africa and to Latin America. Bourbon grows best at heights between 1,100 and 2,000 meters and gives a 20-30% higher yield than Typica. It has a commercially viable level of yield potential and growth habit but is generally susceptible to disease and pests. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Dry process seems simple: pick the fruit, lay it out in the sun until it turns from red to brown to near-back, and then hull off off the thick, dried outer layer in one step to reveal the green bean. It is a method suited to arid regions, where the sun and heat can dry the seed inside the intact fruit skin. It's often referred to as "natural coffee" because of its simplicity, and because the fruit remains intact and undisturbed, a bit like drying grapes into raisins. Since it requires minimal investment, the dry process method is a default to create cheap commodity-grade coffee in areas that have the right climate capable of drying the fruit and seed. But it’s a fail in humid or wet regions. If the drying isn't progressing fast enough, the fruit degrades, rots or molds. Dry-processed coffees can also be wildly inconsistent. If you want a cleanly-fruited, sweet, intense cup, dry process (DP) takes more hand labor than the wet process. Even the most careful pickers will take green unripe or semi-ripe coffee off the branch as they pick red, ripe cherry. If these are not removed in the first days of drying, the green turns to brown that is hard to distinguish from the ripe fruit.

Taste Notes

Vanilla / Golden raisin / Milk chocolate / Cashew nut

Varietal

Yellow Bourbon

Process

Dry (natural)

Elevation

1300 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND Kinone is a single micro washing station run by Bukonzo Organic Farmers Co-operative Union. Founded in 2009, 36 micro washing stations nestled in this pristine green mountainous region contribute to cooperative's total crop. The area's fertile soil is famed for producing some astounding coffees and this one is no exception. Situated at the feet of the Rwenzori mountains just north of Lake George, the region around Kasese has excellent conditions for speciality Arabica production with some of the highest altitude in Uganda, fertile soil and plentiful rainfall. However widespread poverty and a lack of infrastructure, as well as the political upheavel in Uganda over the past 40 years has meant this region has struggled to realise its full potential for speciality arabica production. Organisations such as Bukonzo Co-Operative are leading the way in realising this potential and returning it to its status as a respected speciality arabica producing region in Uganda. This is the first Ugandan washed lot we have ever stocked! Usually with washed SL28 you expect florals and light and fruity but instead you get a mild, balanced cup that leads with raspberry and a mandarin marmalade with citric acidity and a nice sugarcane-like sweetness. THE VARIETY SL28 was bred by Scott Laboratories in 1931 from Tanganyika D.R, and has become very popular throughout Kenya and is recognised as a variety of exceptional cup quality. It has wide leaves with coppery tips. Beans are wide and productivity comparatively low. Though it is not substantiated that we can find, some sources claim that Scott Labs crossed mutations of French Mission, Mocha and Yemen Typica to produce the SL 28 variety. No matter the exact genetic composition, almost certainly their original goal was to create a plant with high quality, reasonable productivity and great drought resistance. SL 34 is a mutation of French Mission, originating from the plantation of Loresho in Kabete, SL 34 has wide leaves with bronzy tips. It is widely grown throughout Kenya. SL 34 is valued for its high productivity in different climate conditions and great height ranges. It is also claimed to be resistant towards draught and strong rainfall. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Red ripe cherries are carefully selected and delivered to the washing station on the day of harvest then placed in a flotation tank to separate by density. The cherries which sink to the bottom (the highest quali- ty) are separated for processing. After removing the outer pulp the coffee is fermented without water for around 24 hours, depending on climatic conditions. The coffee parchment is then washed in clean water channels. The wet parchment is dried in the sun on raised beds for 3 days, followed by shade drying until the coffee has reached a moisture content of 12%. They must be frequently turned to ensure consistent drying. The dried parchment is then delivered to the co-op’s central dry mill and rested before being hulled, graded by bean size and bagged in Grainpro for export.

Taste Notes

Raspberry / Mandarin / Prune / Clove / Cane sugar

Varietal

SL14 & SL28

Process

Wet (washed)

Elevation

1600-2000 mt

Description

THE STORY BEHIND This coffee comes from Planadas, South Tolima, aggregated between numerous smallholders from the Agprocem group, made up of 35 producers. The group was formed in 2013 by Edison Vaquiro and Israel Montes in the Montalvo area of Planadas. During the harvest season, coffee is picked and pulped before being left to ferment for 12 – 16 hours overnight. The coffee is then washed and naturally sun dried on roof tops or in parabolic driers. THE DECAF PROCESS The coffee first undergoes steaming at low pressures to remove the silver skins before then being moistened with hot water to allow the beans to swell and soften. This then prepares the coffee for the hydrolysis of caffeine, which is attached to the salts of the chlorogenic acid within the coffee. The extractors (naturally obtained from the fermentation of sugar cane and not from chemical synthesis) are then filled with moistened coffee which is washed several times with the natural ethyl acetate solvent, to reduce the caffeine down to the correct levels. Once this process is finished the coffee then must be cleaned of the remaining ethyl acetate by using a flow of low pressured saturated steam, before moving onto the final steps. From here the coffee is sent to vacuum drying drums where the water previously used to moisten the beans is removed and the coffee dried to between 10-12%. The coffee is then cooled quickly to ambient temperature using fans before the final step of carnauba wax being applied to polish and provide the coffee with protection against environmental conditions and to help provide stability. From here, the coffee is the packed into 70kg bags ready for export. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Washed coffees focus solely on the bean. They let you taste you what’s on the inside, not the outside. Washed coffees depend almost 100% on the bean having absorbed enough natural sugars and nutrients during its growing cycle. This means the varietal, soil, weather, ripeness, fermentation, washing, and drying are absolutely key. Washed coffees reflect both the science of growing the perfect coffee bean and the fact that farmers are an integral part of crafting the taste of a coffee bean. When looking at washed coffees, it becomes apparent that the country of origin and environmental conditions play a vital role in adding to the flavour. During wet processing, the pulp (i.e.the exocarp and a part of the mesocarp) is removed mechanically. The remaining mesocarp, called mucilage, sticks to the parchment and is also removed before drying. During this process, the sugars present in the mucilage are removed through natural fermentation or mechanical scrubbing. Mucilage is insoluble in water and clings to parchment too strongly to be removed by simple washing. Mucilage can be removed by fermentation followed by washing or by strong friction in machines called mucilage removers. Fermentation can be done by stacking the coffee outside or placing them under water and allowing nature to take its course. After the sugars are removed, the beans then can be taken through a secondary washing to remove any additional debris, or taken immediately to the beds for drying.

Taste Notes

Graham cracker / Caramel / Orange / Cocoa

Varietal

Caturra, Castillo

Process

Wet (washed)

Elevation

1650-2100mt

Description

DESCRIPTION Cignobianco is our signature and only espresso blend and has been the staple of our lineup since the very beginning. It is our interpretation of the perfect everyday coffee, something to be enjoyed whenever the desire takes you. To create it we carefully source two fresh-crop lots of speciality grade Arabica, working closely with the farmers to ensure the highest quality, and then infuse them with our passion and expertise to create a harmonious and balanced taste experience. This supreme balance and wonderful sweetness is reminiscent the grace and elegance of the White Swan (Cigno bianco) THE VARIETY A cross between highly productive Mundo Novo and compact Caturra, made by the Instituto Agronomico (IAC) of Sao Paulo State in Campinas, Brazil. The plant is highly productive compared to Bourbon, in part because of its small size, which allows plants to be closely spaced; it can be planted at nearly double the density. The plant’s shape makes it relatively easy apply pest and disease treatments. It is mainly characterized by great vigor and its low height; it is less compact than Caturra. It is highly susceptible to coffee leaf rust. Catuaí derives from the Guarani multo mom, meaning “very good." Today, it is considered to have good but not great cup quality. . The cultivar was created in 1949 from a crossing of yellow Caturra and Mundo Novo, and initially called H-2077.There are yellow-fruited and red-fruited types, and there have since been many selections in different countries The variety was released in Brazil 1972 after pedigree selection (selection of individual plants through successive generations) and is in wide cultivation there. It was first introduced in Honduras in 1979, where it was tested by Instituto Hondureño del Café (IHCAFÉ). It was released commercially in 1983, after IHCAFÉ selected two lines for planting. In Honduras today, Catui accounts for nearly half of the Arabica coffee in cultivation. Researchers at IHCAFÉ are actively pursuing breeding with Catuai, including creating hybrid crosses between Catuai and Timor Hybrid lines. It is also economically important in Costa Rica, where a yellow-fruiting Catuai was introduced in 1985, whose descendants have spread widely through the country. It was introduced into Guatemala in 1970; currently about 20% of the country’s production is Catuai. It has a negligible presence in other Central American countries. Catuai, whose small stature allows it to be planted densely and harvested more efficiently, led in part to the intensification of full-sun coffee cultivation in Central America in the 1970s and 1980s. THE FERMENTATION PROCESS Dry process seems simple: pick the fruit, lay it out in the sun until it turns from red to brown to nearly black, and then hull off off the thick, dried outer layer in one step to reveal the green bean. It is a method suited to arid regions, where the sun and heat can dry the seed inside the intact fruit skin. It's often referred to as "natural coffee" because of its simplicity, and because the fruit remains intact and undisturbed, a bit like drying grapes into raisins. Since it requires minimal investment, the dry process method is a default to create cheap commodity-grade coffee in areas that have the right climate capable of drying the fruit and seed. But it’s a fail in humid or wet regions. If the drying isn't progressing fast enough, the fruit degrades, rots or molds. Dry-processed coffees can also be wildly inconsistent. If you want a cleanly-fruited, sweet, intense cup, dry process (DP) takes more hand labor than the wet process. Even the most careful pickers will take green unripe or semi-ripe coffee off the branch as they pick red, ripe cherry. If these are not removed in the first days of drying, the green turns to brown that is hard to distinguish from the ripe fruit.

Taste Notes

Milk Chocolate / Almond / Yellow Plum / Caramel

Varietal

Red and Yellow Catuaì / Red Catuaì

Process

Dry (natural)

Elevation

1150 masl / 1550 masl