Drop


Regular price $5.99

Description

Ethiopia is very special, the taste profiles you only get from there, the country and the culture. This is a coffee we’ve been buying from Hunkute for six years now, a cooperative of 920 members in the Dalle region in Sidama. With rural growing condition, Hunkute keeps delivering absolutely stunning coffee year on year. The coffee is delicate, yet well balanced with a vibrant citric acidity and notes of apricot and black tea. For the first year, we are coffee is Organic certified. It is the same coffee we've been buying as before, but as many costumes were asking for a certified coffee we have decided to certify our roastery and can now sell Hunkute as organic to you. TsegayeAnebo_JoannaAlm_SeifeTuuloskorpi Roasting Hunkute in Stockholm with Tsegaye Anebo, manager of Sidama Union that Hunkute belongs to and our green coffee partner Nordic Approach's, Seife Tuuloskorpi. About Hunkute Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee. More than anything I'm amazed by how they live with the product. In Ethiopia, many processes, roast and drink their coffee themselves, as a country is consuming over 40% of what they are producing themselves. In Ethiopia there are over 1.1 million smallholder coffee farmers, delivering cherries to a cooperative or private washing station. Hunkute is made up of two washing stations (the imaginatively named Hunkute Site 1 and Hunkute Site 2) and is located in the highlands of Dalle region in Sidamo, both belonging to Hunkute Cooperative, made up of 920 members (2018). Hunkute Cooperative is connected to the Sidama Union. Hunkute 1 is located at an altitude of 1850 meters and started ten years ago whilst Hunkute 2 is located at 2150 meters and started five years ago. The washing stations are collecting cherries from both the members and surrounding farmers who want to deliver their cherries to the washing station. Visiting Hunkute June 2017 Sustainability aspect - Payment and agriculture at Hunkute Since Sidama is such a mecca in coffee the market is competitive for the cooperatives in the region. This is one of the reasons Hunkute are paying the farmers up front daily during harvest (November-January) unless the farmer prefers different. They also have a second payment based on the selling price which is being paid to the farmers very latest by August, which is a great difference compared to how late we've seen some farmers being paid when visiting several cooperatives in Ethiopia. In the Sidama Union, about 70% of the payment is going back to the farmers and the rest are for investments at the washing stations and the cooperative. Being both certified Organic and with Fair Trade, which is one of the reasons why the washing station is good at keeping documents and reports of payments and data logging of the production. The production at Hunkute The coffee is being picked and delivered by surrounding farmers and members of the cooperative. Before processing the ripe cherries are being separated from un-ripe. Another separation of grading is done in the pulper (where the outer skin is removed), in channels (where floaters and unripe are separated) and when sorted and turned on the drying beds by hand. The 920 connected members to Hunkute is delivering coffee during harvest from the nearby area in Dalle. Throughout the year, organic fertilizer is common at the farms. Pruning of the trees is less common. The coffee needs to be mainly mature red to be considered as "Grade One". Cherries are hand sorted for unripe and overripe cherries by the farmers before they go into production. The same afternoon/evening as picking has been done the coffee is being pulped meaning that the skin and pulp are removed from the beans and yet again separated by density. After this, the beans are being fermented under water for 24-36 hours, dependent on the weather conditions. It’s then graded in washing channels into two grades based on density before soaked under clean water in tanks for 12-24 hours. Hunkute, Drying beds, Drop Coffee The coffee is then removed to raised beds where the coffee is dried in the sun for 10 to 15 days covered with hessian cloths. During midday and at night coffees are covered in plastic. Sidamo Union has from last year dry milled the coffee at their own new mill belonging to the union. Whilst they previously have used a dry mill in Addis Abebbea. Have seen the previous mill I could tell that the working conditions were massively improved with proper light and not much dust and from the beans that the process have been more even in terms of the grading and sorting this year. How we buy it All of the cooperatives in Ethiopia belong to a Union, in this case, the Sidamo Union, which sell and export the coffee to our green coffee partner Nordic Approach. Through them, we've been buying Hunkute for six years and have visited the washing stations Hunkute 1 and 2 many times throughout the years.

Taste Notes

A delicate yet blanched cup. Notes of apricot, citric acidity, black tea and a hint of white floral.

Varietal

Ethiopian Heirloom. Improved varietals and native coffee of forest origin.

Process

Fully Washed

Elevation

1850 - 2150 meters

Description

El Sunzita is a great example of driven producers that are putting in the extra work to achieve a higher the quality and how small-scale producers and roasters can work together for higher quality. The owners Mary and Mauricio Ortiz are agronomists used to deliver coffee to the local mill in El Sunza, that Drop Coffee bought coffee from. Today their coffee is kept separated and we are buying the coffee sourced to the couple Ortiz farm. Year on year we are getting more varietals kept separated. This is the Yellow Bourbon. The taste profile is mature with notes of roasted hazelnuts, lime zest acidity and fresh dates red apple juice. About the farm El Sunzita Mary and Mauri got handed their current piece of land through Mauricio's family 29 years ago when they got married and started to grow coffee at the plot. Mauricio is an agronomist and Mary is good at admin and business. Step by step they have built up an incredibly beautiful farm on the land. Today they have built a nursery to be able to change weaker plants, installed a small pulper to be able to try experiments on and their grown-up kids are getting more and more involved too. The farm belongs to the mountain pitch El Sunza, with a total of 140 hectares of coffee farms, owned by Mauricio's brother. All the coffee from El Sunza are being processed together and so did this also this coffee used to be and the first year we bought it as such. Drop Coffee and El Sunzita In 2015, Mary and Mauricio decided wanted to produce the coffee from their farm fully individual. They named their farm as a small bit of El Sunza, El Sunzita and their aim was to process higher quality and sell this individually. We’re now happy to have the coffee from El Sunzita at Drop Coffee, for the fourth year in a row working with the couple. Step by step we’ve been growing the cooperation. Over the last couple of years, our cooperation has given us the opportunity to have the varietals separated from us which means that we can offer these separately to you. Also, the coffees processing has got even better and we have a well-sorted and even beans to roast. The production at El Sunzita On their 16 hectares, they now have a beautiful nursery and a small scale pulper. The altitude of El Sunzita is one of the lowest altitudes coffees we are buying from El Salvador, at 1400 meters above sea level. The quality and consistency from here are great, steady and sweet like a milk chocolate bar. When leaf rust hit El Sunzita they lost half of the yield. However, this is now under control but they still need to apply some pesticides on some individual trees for this. They have always been trying to work the most organic they can. Mauricio as an agronomist and producer is consulting other producers with agronomy too. At El Sunzita he is working as steady and organic as he can, focusing on the three ”S”; The Soil, The Sun and The Shade. By covering the area with the coffee trees with shading trees, sending soil on tests readings and creating their own fertilizers. On the new plants, they have been focusing on building stronger roots of the plants, for three years they've applied biota and are also making fertilisers from the coffee pulp. The future This truly is a family business where the grown-up daughter and sons are getting more and more involved in the business, Mauricio is managing the farm and Mary is doing the economy and logistics for the business. We’ve been visiting the farm every year since we started working together El Sunzita has improved their highest quality. Today 40% of what El Sunzita produce is still commercial coffee and is being processed as El Sunza, but year by year they are turning more of their volume into the speciality.

Taste Notes

Medium body with a mouthfeel. Mature cup profile with notes of roasted hazelnuts, lime zest acidity and raisin. malic like acidity reminding of red apples. The coffee has a smooth mouthfeel reminding of raisin lemonade.

Varietal

Yellow Bourbon

Process

Full-washed

Elevation

1400 meters above sea level

Description

This is the Java varietal from La Linda in Bolivia. The coffee is nutty and elegant with some white floral notes. The varietal Java doesn't give a big crop at La Linda, but the cup profile is elegant. Although the risk for leaf rust is high, the coffee produced by Roudriguez in Bolivia is only sprayed with organic and environmentally friendly products. About Bolivia Bolivia, Bolivia, Bolivia. The high altitude (in La Lindas case, 1650masl), the breath-taking nature, the coffee history, and the almost sugary cup profiles makes this origin a very special place. Bolivia’s past is interesting—although it’s a commercially viable coffee exporting country, its production has always been small. The conditions, although challenging, are exceptional for growing coffee, and this produces a very rich agriculture built on a long history of farming on a very difficult terrain. In 1991, there was a government led initiative to encourage the endogenous population to participate in coffee farming, which led to a fractured system counterintuitive to quality. The arrival of the Cup of Excellence Program in 2004 allowed buyers to find the quality coffee for which Bolivia was already known, but had become difficult to source. The main problem for producers was (and, to some extent, still is) that they are unable to make enough money to be sustainable. To subsidise their income, they looked to other crops, mainly coca (the crop that is used to produce cocaine, legal in Bolivia). Encouraged by the government, coca is four times more profitable and is much easier to grow than coffee, and this sadly led to coffee producers turning their back on coffee or, even worse, abandoning their farms. Coca farming involves a lot of chemicals and fertilisers that are not good to the soil and land, so farming coca leads to the soil being infertile and overworked. Over time, coca-farmed land is unusable for any crop. Bolivian governmental support for growing coca has led to a break-down of relations with the USA, who had previously supported Bolivian agriculture and economy in the early 2000s. The resulting war on drugs in Bolivia has since led to many initiatives to help coffee farmers, with things like the Cup of Excellence being financially supported by USAID. As if these difficulties weren’t enough to overcome, the arrival of leaf rust in 2013 (a fungus that attacks the leaves of a coffee tree and makes it impossible to photosynthesise) meant that the country lost over 50% of its production that year alone. The combination of both government policy and leaf rust means that Bolivia’s coffee production has dropped by over 70 % in the past ten years, leaving the county a minor player in the world of coffee. This means that to find the very best coffees from Bolivia, we have to pay a higher price—but this isn’t a bad thing. The small volumes available and current demand for great coffees mean that, for once, coffee producers are on the front foot. To showcase how good Bolivian coffee can taste, the Rodriguez family has planted different varietals such as Caturra, Geisha - and as in this case Java. They are also experimenting with different processes with each varietal. About the Roudriguez The Rodriguez family is our exporter for all of our coffee from Bolivia. They also have their own processing mills where they are processing coffee for farmers in the Caranarvi and Sud Yungas region, before exporting it. The family have been sourcing coffee from small coffee producers for three decades, but the steady decline of coffee production has put the sustainability of their export business in jeopardy. Without the intervention of people like the Rodriguez family, however, the future of coffee production in Bolivia is at risk of disappearing. Caranavi, located 150 kilometres north of La Paz city, it is seen as the centre of Bolivian specialty coffee production. With the super-rich soil, combined with high altitudes, for me it is the epicentre for coffee production in Bolivia. The family has taken on the challenge of increasing the production of Bolivian coffee by planting their own new coffee plantations. Sustainability Added to this, they have also introduced a sustainable model for the producers who supply them at their mill, and built this on three mantras: economical sustainability, social understanding, and environmental awareness - Sol de Manana. All the coffee plants are only sprayed with organic and environmentally friendly spray. This takes great knowledge of agriculture to do. The Roudriguez family's company is fully certified organic, but as our importer isn't, this coffee can't be marked as such. About La Linda In 2014, the Rodriguez family bought land in Caranavi region to showcase their practises and educate other producers in sustainable farming, as well as increasing the overall volume at their mills. They prepared the land on 20,6 hectares and planted Red Caturra, Java and Geisha. This part of the lot is named after its beauty - La Linda. About the Java varietal The coffee growing at La Linda is brought in from another coffee producer whom Steve (part owner in Drop Coffee) is working with in Nicaragua. The varietal also goes under the name Longberry as that is just what it looks like - the berries and the seeds (beans) are long and slim. The Java does give a smaller crop than expected at La Linda. Some areas of the farm are now being replanted as the crop is too low. However, it's tasting amazing. Elegant, notes of nutmeg and white sweet florals with the Bolivian typical caramel syrup note to it. We’re very proud to present this Bolivian coffee to you all, for the impact it will have on The Rodriguez family’s livelihoods and the future of Bolivian specialty coffee, but also for the sugary, clear taste profile. Roudriguez and Drop Coffee As we buy many coffees from Roudriguez (I think you have noticed) it's a very exciting and good relationship. We love to visit them every year in Caranavi, staying at their mill it's easy to see that there are always new updates and projects going on.

Taste Notes

Elegant cup profile with light to medium body, notes of jasmine, nutmeg, agave syrup and black tea.

Varietal

Java

Process

Washed processed

Elevation

1650 masl

Description

Chorrera is a perfect example of Columbian quality, and is a truly amazing coffee because of the attention to details of a skilled farmer. Of course the land, the varietal and the micro climate is a big factor, and from Pitalito in Huila we do get some amazing taste profiles typical for the region. The kind of vibrant clear acidity you get in those cups I normally just call ”Huila typical acidity” as it is so specific for the coffees grown here. However, the coffee wouldn’t be shown as good without Pedro and Nelcy Claros work with the coffee. It’s a clear and well balanced cup with a smooth mouthfeel medium to high body. Flavour notes of blood orange and cacao nibs. La Chorrera is also the coffee that our barista, Matt Winton will represented Drop Coffee and Sweden with in the World Barista Championships, placing 8th in the World. About the farm La Chorrera Finca La Chorrera is eight hectares with six hectares of it being used to grow coffee. La Chorrera is located on top of a mountain at 1,735 metres and contains 70% Caturra (25,000 plants; this lot comes from them), 20% Colombia F6 (7,000 plants) and 10% Castillo (2,000 plants). There is a lot of coffee coming out of here, but Pedro is separating it all into day lots. The coffees cupping over 86 we have chosen from and this one is a result of heaps of separation and quality control - as specialty coffee normally is. They have a very pretty garden and put extreme focus on the coffee, but the drying patio is what stood out the most to me when visiting Chorrera for the first time 3 years ago. It’s a greenhouse built on top of the house so that the coffee can be turned regularly, but also to make sure no one steals it. The latter was not so much of a problem last year with market prices being low, but it was a real problem over the previous three years. Of course, Pedro doesn't have to worry about market prices; he always gets a premium because he consistently delivers quality, but black market coffee goes to the highest bidder. Pedro Claros is reading the moisture level of the coffee every day and logging his data. His hard work on this has increased the quality, as well as increasing his work opportunities. He is now consulting surrounding producers in the area delivering coffee to the same exporters. 8th place in World Barista Championship 2018 This is the coffee our barista Matt used in his World Barista Championship 2018 routine by the end of June, placing 8th. Which is the best Sweden have placed in a decade. About the varietal Most of the farm is growing Caturra. It is a traditional varietal to grow in Colombia. It's been a campaign from the Federación Nacional de Cafeteros (The National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia) to grow Café de Colombia which is a leaf resistant strain, compared to the susceptible Caturra. The captain has included free seedlings to coffee producers to encourage them to replant. A few mavericks have continued to grow Caturra pricing its cup quality. About the Claros Pedro and Nelcy Claros have six children (Alberio, Edilson, Sandra, Hermes, Diana and Monica) who are also helping out at the farm. Finca La Chorrera is located near to the city of Pitalito, in the south of the Huila department. It's in the valley of the Rio Grande de la Magdalena, known as 'The Valley of Laboyos', which is 180 km away from Nieva, the capital of Huila. Pitalito is also the second largest city of the department of Huila, at approximately 125,000 inhabitants, and is considered one of the largest areas of coffee production in Colombia. Drop Coffee and Finca La Chorrera As all the farms we are working with, we have visited Finca La Chorrera. Our barista Matt Winton was looking for a coffee to compete with in the World Barista Championship in June representing Sweden and Drop Coffee. He was looking for a well-balanced and high scoring coffee and chose this one on a table alongside Geishas, Javas and crazy processes. That is just how good this coffee is, an extremely high quality well balanced coffee with a lovely Huila typical acidity. This year it’s the first year we are buying it, however Drop Coffees part-owner has been working with this farm for a decade and cups every day lot that the Claros family is separating and pays for the beans according to the cupping scores.

Taste Notes

A well balanced cup with notes of dark chocolate mixed with blood orange, lime, blackberry and a smooth medium to high body. A finish of tonic water.

Varietal

70% Caturra, 20% Colombia F6 and 10% Castillo

Elevation

1,735 m.a.s.l.

Description

This product is the washed processed Caturra varietal from Roudriguez. From this farm we are buying many different coffees and processes. This year we will have - Washed Caturra (this product) from the farm Alasitas - Natural Caturra - nano lot from the farm Alasitas - Natural Java - nano lot from the farm La Linda - Washed Geisha - nano lot from the farm Alasitas - Natural Geisha - nano lot from the farm Alasitas We’re very proud to present this Bolivian coffee to you all, for the potential impact of the future of Bolivian specialty coffee production, but also for the sugary, clear taste profile. To showcase how good Bolivian coffee can taste, the Rodriguez family has planted different varietals such as this Red Caturra as well as the Geisha and Java that will be released later this year. The taste profile of this Red Caturra from Roudriguez farm, Alasitas has a high sweetness and delicious almost drinking chocolate mouthfeel and some flavor notes of green apple and nettles that almost makes the coffee fizzy. This year the Caturra from Alasitas have turned out even more fruity than last year. About the Rodriguez family The Rodriguez family own their own mills, processing and exporting coffee for farmers in the Caranarvi and Sud Yungas region. The family has been sourcing coffee from small coffee producers for three decades, but the steady decline of coffee production has put the sustainability of their export business in jeopardy. Without the intervention of people like the Rodriguez family however, the future of coffee production in Bolivia is at risk of disappearing. The family has taken on the challenge of increasing the production of Bolivian coffee by planting their own new coffee plantations. The farm Alasitas In 2014, the Rodriguez family bought land in Caranavi region to showcase their practises and educate other producers in sustainable farming, as well as increasing the overall volume at their mills. They prepared the land on 20,6 hectares and planted Red Caturra, Java and Geisha. The name of the farm is Las Alasitas, which in the Aimara native language means “buy me”. Caranavi, located 150 kilometres north of La Paz city, it is seen as the centre of Bolivian specialty coffee production. With the super rich soil, combined with high altitudes, for me it is the epicentre for coffee production in Bolivia. We’re very proud to present this Bolivian coffee to you all, for the impact it will have on the livelihood of the people working for the Rodriguez family as well as the future of Bolivian specialty coffee. But don’t forget the sugary, clear taste profile. First of all, the taste profile of Alasitas, as the other coffees we've had from Rodriguez, excites me. The coffees from them has a high sweetness and delicious chocolate notes coming together in a very special cup. To showcase how good Bolivian coffee can taste, the Rodriguez family has planted different varietals such as this Red Caturra and the previous Geisha and Java we've had from the family. The Rodriguez family has in the last three years introduced a sustainability model for the producers who supply them at their mill, and built this on three mantras: economical sustainability, social understanding, and environmental awareness - Sol de Mañana. This means that we're also buying coffee from individual producers that are getting extra support from the Roudrigez family in prevention of leaf-rust and how to produce higher quantity as well as quality. In our current offerings from the Sol de Mañana project we also have Carmelita, and will have more available in the coming months. About Bolivia as a coffee producing country I have to start by saying that I have fallen in love with Bolivia, the people, the country, and their coffee. Bolivia’s high altitude (in Alasitas case, 1580masl), the breath-taking nature, the coffee history, and the quality of the cup with its clear taste profile making it a very special place. Bolivia’s past is interesting—although it’s a commercially viable coffee exporting country, its production has always been small. The conditions, although challenging, are exceptional for growing coffee, and this produces a very rich agriculture built on a long history of farming on a very difficult terrain. In 1991, there was a government led initiative to encourage the endogenous population to participate in coffee farming, which led to a fractured system counterintuitive to quality. The arrival of the Cup of Excellence Program in 2004 allowed buyers to find the quality coffee for which Bolivia was already known, but that had become difficult to source. The main problem for producers was (and, to some extent, still is) that they are unable to make enough money to be sustainable. To subsidise their income, they looked to other crops, mainly coca (the crop that is used to produce cocaine, which is legal in Bolivia). Encouraged by the government, coca is four times more profitable and is much easier to grow than coffee, and this sadly led to coffee producers turning their back on coffee or just abandoning their farms. Coca farming involves a lot of chemicals and fertilisers that are not good to the soil and land, so farming coca leads to the soil being infertile and overworked. Over time, coca-farmed land is unusable for any crop. Bolivian governmental support for growing coca has led to a break-down of relations with the USA, who had previously supported Bolivian agriculture and economy in the early 2000s. The resulting war on drugs in Bolivia has since led to many initiatives to help coffee farmers, with things like the Cup of Excellence being financially supported by USAID. As if these difficulties weren’t enough to overcome, the arrival of leaf rust in 2013 (a fungus that attacks the leaves of a coffee tree and makes it impossible to photosynthesise) meant that the country lost over 50% of its production that year alone. The combination of both government policy and leaf rust means that Bolivia’s coffee production has dropped by over 70 % in the past ten years, leaving the county a minor player in the world of coffee. This means that to find the very best coffees from Bolivia, we have to pay a much higher than normal price compared to other coffee producing countries—but this isn’t a bad thing. The small volumes available and current demand for great coffees mean that, for once, coffee producers are on the forefront.

Taste Notes

Medium body with a creamy mouthfeel, reminding of drinking chocolate. Flavour notes of caramel and green apple, with a finish of cacao nibs.

Varietal

Red Caturra

Process

Fully Washed

Elevation

1580 masl

Description

We’re very proud to present the coffee from Carmelita Urduvi. This coffee is from Carmelita's first harvest in the sustainability project Sol de Mañana. After getting hit with Roja a few years ago she started growing new plants of Caturra and Catuaí. For three years, we have visited and waited for the new harvest to come. This year we set up a blind cupping competition between all of the delivering producer of the Sol de la Mañana project and were not surprised to see Carmelita's cup win. Carmelita has a two-hectare farm, 1550-1850 masl in Copacabana, Bolivia. Why we love to work with Carmelita Urduvi We visited Carmelita for the first time three years ago. Her hard work, and dedication to the farm impressed us greatly. She had a single hectare, which had a low yield, and then got hit with Roja, which is why she decided to become a part of the sustainability project “Sol de la Mañana”, run by our exporter Rodriguez. When we met, Carmelita had just prepared her land for a second hectare, and was ready to start planting her new Caturra and Catuaí seedlings from her nursery. This time she wanted to do everything right from the beginning, with help of the agronomists in the Sol de la Mañana project. This is the first crop from those plants, harvested in August to late September 2017. The history of Carmelita Carmelita Urduvi has been working in coffee for 40 years. Originally she is from Omasuyos, near the lake called Titicaca. She moved with her husband to Caranavi when a government led to reform and gave the land back to thousands of indigenous families. Since then they had 8 children. Carmelita raised their children while running the farm after her husband disappeared. She feels like this is her greatest achievement. Her oldest son works full time on the farm throughout the whole year, another two of her sons work for our exporter Rodriguez Buena Vista farms. Her 2-hectare farm is situated at 1400 masl, in the colonial Copacabana, a few kilometres from Caranavi. Although she has recently increased the size of her farm, she has no plans of increasing any further since she wants to focus on producing the best quality coffee she can. On her farm, she is applying practices that have been recommended from the Sol de la Mañana project. She has started one-hectare brand new; preparing fresh land, planting strong Caturra and Catuaì seedlings and doing what she can to increase quality, and prevent getting hit by Roja again. Unique to anyone else we have met in Bolivia, she is known to clean each berry after picking and before putting it into her bags and delivering it to processing at the Roudriguez mill. She understands that by producing a better quality coffee she will be able to earn more money and have a better future for her and her children. Her favourite coffee variety is Catuai, as it is a strong plant, and more resistant to the disease on her land. Yet, she faces challenges such as ensuring she can afford enough fertiliser and preventing the spread of weeds during the rainy season. Carmelita believes that joining the program has helped her to better understand what she needs to do to produce better coffee. Sustainability project The Sol de la Mañana is a project that we are taking a part of that was started by our exporter. We are paying more for the coffee to give support to the farmers being a part of the project. The aim is to improve the farmers coffee quality and quantity in an economical and sustainable way, and to help them prevent the spread of Roja. As a part of the project the farmers get agricultural support and training. They also have access to plants and seedlings that are more resistant to diseases with several varietals to choose from. When visiting our exporter this September, the Rodriguez family had organised a competition with all of the delivering producers to their mill in the Sol de la Mañana in Caranavi. We were the head judges, using the Cup of Excellence score sheet, but all of the producers were cupping their coffee too. It was fully blind with one qualification round and one final. The winning cup was white sugary sweet, almost toffee-like, notes of white florals and lemon. But more than anything it was very transparent and clear. The winning cup belongs to Carmelita. As a first prize she was given fertilisers for her crops, and then, of course, we bought the coffee on a winning price for the lot she handed in - the competition lot will be released later this year. About Drop Coffee and Carmelita Since the first time, we met Carmelita we had a strong feeling that we were going to work together. She is driven, light-minded and super focused on quality. As we are concerned in continuing working with Carmelita but are buying the coffee through our exporter Rodriguez. To motivate Carmelita to continue to work with us we have paid an extra dollar per kilo straight to her with the agreement that we get to buy her coffee next year as well. We have to say we love her work from the first time we visited three years ago. Finally getting to taste her new coffee is an absolute pleasure and we are so proud to buy half of her production (sharing it with Melbourne Coffee Merchants), we have a European exclusivity on Carmelita's coffee and have a feeling this will continue to be one of our strong relationship coffees for many years ahead. We admire Carmelita and her floral and elegant coffee added to the bigger and sweet profile we get from the Bolivian coffees.

Taste Notes

Medium body with a creamy mouthfeel. Flavour notes of white grape, black tea and with a note of buttercup flower (smörblomma).

Varietal

Caturra & Catuai

Process

Fully washed

Elevation

1550 – 1850 MASL